Page 1 sur 3 123 DernièreDernière
Affichage des résultats 1 à 10 sur 29

Discussion: Vietnam: décès de l'ex-Première dame

  1. #1
    Nouveau Viêt Avatar de Quangourou
    Date d'inscription
    juin 2010
    Messages
    32

    Par défaut Vietnam: décès de l'ex-Première dame

    Vietnam: décès de l'ex-Première dame

    AFP
    27/04/2011 | Mise à jour : 06:57 Réagir
    Tran Le Xuan, la scandaleuse et puissante belle-soeur du président du Sud-Vietnam Ngo Dinh Diem dans les années 50 et 60, considérée à l'époque comme la première dame du régime pro-américain, est décédée à Rome, selon des médias vietnamiens.

    Selon le site internet VNExpress, citant le magazine Nguoi Viet Nam Chau consacré aux Vietnamiens de la diaspora, celle dont l'Histoire se souvient sous le sobriquet de Mme Nhu est décédée dimanche dans un hôpital de Rome. Le quotidien américain New York Times a confirmé son décès en citant sa soeur, Lechi Oggeri.

    Née en 1924 à Hanoï, Mme Nhu est une des grandes figures de la guerre du Vietnam, une "femme fatale" calculatrice et sophistiquée alliant controverse, influence politique et déclarations fracassantes.

    Les historiens et experts lui prêtent une influence énorme sur le président Diem, malgré la piètre estime en laquelle la tenaient les Etats-Unis. Avide de visibilité médiatique, réclamant que les journaux l'appelent "Mme Ngo", elle imposera notamment l'adoption d'un code de la famille faisant des femmes l'égal des hommes, et bannissant la polygamie, la divorce et l'adultère.

    Elle intervint violemment à Washington en 1963 en accusant les Etats-Unis de trahison alors que se réduisait l'aide américaine au régime de Diem, assassiné peu après. Et fit scandale notamment en qualifiant de "barbecue" l'immolation par le feu de moines bouddhistes opposés à la dictature de son beau-frère.

    Francophone, issue d'une riche famille aristocratique, elle avait épousé en 1943 Ngo Dinh Nhu, frère de Ngo Dinh Diem, alors parti aux Etats-Unis pour monter un mouvement nationaliste anti-communiste.

    Brièvement détenue par des soldats Viet Minh emmenés par Ho Chi Minh en 1946, au début de la guerre contre les Français, elle rejoint Saïgon (devenue Ho Chi Minh-Ville) en 1953 avec Nhu, qui organise des manifestations anti-coloniales et anti-communistes.

    En 1954, dans la foulée des accords de Genève qui coupent le pays en deux tout en lui accordant l'indépendance, l'empereur vietnamien Bao Dai, réinstallé par les Français, appelle Diem des Etats-Unis pour en faire son Premier ministre.

    L'année suivante, lors d'un référendum truqué, Diem prend le pouvoir et fonde la République du Vietnam qu'il dirige d'une main de fer avec le "clan Ngo" composé de plusieurs de ses frères.

    Célibataire, il gouverne sous influence de Nhu et de sa belle-soeur, qui devient alors de facto la première dame du pays jusqu'à l'assassinat des deux hommes en 1963 au terme d'un complot de CIA, alors qu'elle se trouvait aux Etats-Unis. Mère de quatre enfants, elle avait partagé les dernières années de sa vie entre la France et l'Italie.


    Le Figaro - Flash Actu : Vietnam: décès de l'ex-Première dame

  2. # ADS
    Circuit publicitaire
    Date d'inscription
    Toujours
    Messages
    Plusieurs
     

  3. #2
    Nouveau Viêt Avatar de Quangourou
    Date d'inscription
    juin 2010
    Messages
    32

    Par défaut

    Madame Nhu, Vietnam War Lightning Rod, Dies
    By JOSEPH R. GREGORY

    Madame Nhu, who as the glamorous official hostess in South Vietnam’s presidential palace became a politically powerful and often harshly outspoken figure in the early years of the Vietnam War, died on Sunday in Rome, where she had been living. She was believed to be 87.


    Enlarge This Image

    Larry Burrows/Time Life Pictures--Getty Images

    Madame Nhu at the Saigon airport in 1963.



    Her death was confirmed by her sister, Lechi Oggeri.
    Born in 1924 — the date is uncertain, though some sources say April 15 — she spent the last four decades in Rome and southern France.
    Her parents named her Tran Le Xuan, or “Beautiful Spring.” As the official hostess to the unmarried president of South Vietnam, her brother-in-law, she was formally known as Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu. But to the American journalists, diplomats and soldiers caught up in the intrigues of Saigon in the early 1960s, she was “the Dragon Lady,” a symbol of everything that was wrong with the American effort to save her country from Communism.
    In those years, before the United States deepened its military involvement in the war, Madame Nhu thrived in the eye of her country’s gathering storm as the wife of Ngo Dinh Nhu, the younger brother and chief political adviser to Ngo Dinh Diem, the president of South Vietnam from 1955 until 1963.
    While her husband controlled the secret police and special forces, Madame Nhu acted as a forceful counterweight to the diffident president, badgering Diem’s aides, allies and critics with unwelcome advice, public threats and subtle manipulations. Then, after both men were killed in a military coup mounted with the tacit support of the United States, she slipped into obscurity.
    In her years in the spotlight, when she was in her 30s, she was beautiful, well coiffed and petite. She made the form-fitting ao dai her signature outfit, modifying the national dress with a deep neckline. Whether giving a speech, receiving diplomats or reviewing members of her paramilitary force of 25,000 women, she drew photographers like a magnet. But it was her impolitic penchant for saying exactly what she thought that drew world attention.
    When, during Diem’s early days in power, she heard that the head of the army, Gen. Nguyen Van Hinh, was bragging that he would overthrow the president and make her his mistress, she confronted him at a Saigon party. “You are never going to overthrow this government because you don’t have the guts,” Time magazine quoted her as telling the startled general. “And if you do overthrow it, you will never have me because I will claw your throat out first.”
    Her “capacity for intrigue was boundless,” William Prochnau wrote in “Once Upon a Distant War: Young War Correspondents and the Early Vietnam Battles” (1995). So was her hatred of the American press.
    “Madame Nhu looked and acted like the diabolical femme fatale in the popular comic strip of the day, ‘Terry and the Pirates,’ ” Mr. Prochnau wrote. “Americans gave her the comic-strip character’s name: the Dragon Lady.”
    In the pivotal year of 1963, as the war with the North worsened, discontent among the South’s Buddhist majority over official corruption and failed land reform efforts fueled protests that culminated in the public self-immolations of several Buddhist monks. Shocking images of the fiery suicides raised the pressure on Diem, as did Madame Nhu’s well-publicized reaction. She referred to the suicides as “barbecues” and told reporters, “Let them burn and we shall clap our hands.”
    Tran Le Xuan was the younger daughter of Nam Tran Chuong, herself the daughter of an imperial Vietnamese princess, and Tran Van Chuong, a patrician lawyer who later became Diem’s ambassador to Washington. As a willful girl, she bullied her younger brother, Khiem Van Tran, and was more devoted to the piano and the ballet than to her studies.
    She later resisted any arranged marriage, choosing in 1943 to wed one of her mother’s friends, Ngo Dinh Nhu. Fifteen years her senior, he was from a prominent Hue family of Roman Catholics who opposed both French colonial rule and the Communist rebels. Tran Le Xuan, raised a Buddhist, embraced her new family’s faith as well as its politics.

    As World War II ended, Vietnam’s battle for independence intensified. In 1946, Communist troops overran Hue, taking Madame Nhu, her infant daughter and aging mother-in-law prisoner. They were held for four months in a remote village with little food and no comforts before being freed by the advancing French. After she was reunited with her husband, the family lived quietly for the next few years, an interlude that Madame Nhu would later refer to as her “happy time.” She and her husband would eventually have four children, two boys and two girls.
    In 1955, Diem became president of the newly independent South Vietnam, his authority menaced by private armies, gangsters and disloyal officers like General Hinh. Madame Nhu publicly urged Diem to act. This only embarrassed him, and he exiled her to a convent in Hong Kong. Then he reconsidered, took her advice, smashed his opponents and forced Hinh into exile.
    Madame Nhu returned, complaining that life in the convent had been “just like the Middle Ages.” But then, so was the lot of most Vietnamese women. After winning a seat in the National Assembly in 1956, Madame Nhu pushed through measures that increased women’s rights. She also orchestrated government moves to ban contraceptives and abortion, outlaw adultery, forbid divorce and close opium dens and brothels. “Society,” she declared, “cannot sacrifice morality and legality for a few wild couples.”
    Meanwhile, she kept a tight emotional hold on the president. According to a C.I.A. report, Diem came to think of his sister-in-law like a spouse. She “relieves his tension, argues with him, needles him, and, like a Vietnamese wife, is dominant in the household,” the report said. It also said that their relationship was definitely not sexual. When Diem, who was notoriously prudish, once questioned the modesty of Madame Nhu’s low-cut dress, she was said to have snapped back: “It’s not your neck that sticks out, it’s mine. So shut up.”
    In fact, both their lives were on the line. In 1962, renegade Vietnamese Air Force pilots bombed and strafed the presidential palace. Diem was not hurt. Madame Nhu fell through a bomb hole in her bedroom to the basement two floors below, suffering cuts and bruises.
    Vietnamese officers were judged by their loyalty to Diem and Nhu, who kept their best troops close to Saigon, to the exasperation of the Americans. As Communist strength grew, the South’s internal stresses mounted. Diem sought compromise with dissidents, but he was undercut by the Nhus. In August 1963, thousands of Buddhists were arrested and interned. In Washington, Madame Nhu’s father declared that Diem’s government had done more damage than even the Communists and resigned as ambassador; her mother, South Vietnam’s observer at the United Nations, also quit. That fall, Madame Nhu went on an American speaking tour, criticizing Diem’s critics as soft on communism. She was in Los Angeles on Nov. 1 when news flashed that Diem and her husband had been shot to death in a coup. “The deaths were murders,” she told reporters, “either with the official or unofficial blessing of the American government.”
    Refused permission to return to Vietnam, she and her children moved to Rome to be near her brother-in-law, Archbishop Ngo Dinh Thuc. In July 1966, in a vehemently anti-American interview with a French journalist, she expressed sympathy for the Vietnamese Communists and declared that America preaches “the liberty of the jungle.”
    In 1967, her eldest daughter, Le Thuy, was killed in an automobile accident in France. In 1986, her parents were found strangled in their Washington home. Her brother, Khiem, was charged in the killings, motivated, according to the authorities, by the fact that he had been disinherited. In 1993, after seven years in a mental hospital, he was declared incompetent but harmless, and released.
    As time passed, Madame Nhu declined to be interviewed, but in November 1986 she agreed to answer questions in an exchange of letters with The New York Times. In these statements she continued to blame the United States for the fall of South Vietnam and for her brother’s arrest. Asked to describe her daily life, she wrote, “Outer life such as writing and reading has never seemed interesting enough to be talked about, while inner life, more than a secret, is a mystery that cannot be so easily disclosed.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/wo...=1&_r=1&src=me

  4. #3
    Passionné du Việt Nam Avatar de dannyboy
    Date d'inscription
    juillet 2010
    Messages
    1 120

    Par défaut

    On a du mal à comprendre comment une dame aussi distinguée pouvait qualifier l’immolation par le feu des moines bouddhistes au VN de “barbecue show”. Surtout quand elle même était bouddhiste avant de se convertir en catholique.

    L’extrémisme religieuse de la famille Ngô n’était pas la seule cause de leur perte mais a sans doute précipité leur chute.

  5. #4
    Passionné du Việt Nam Avatar de abgech
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2005
    Localisation
    Genève, Suisse
    Messages
    2 042

    Par défaut

    Je vais être brutal et totalement politiquement incorrect : le monde est un peu meilleur aujourd'hui !

  6. #5
    Passionné du Việt Nam Avatar de dannyboy
    Date d'inscription
    juillet 2010
    Messages
    1 120

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par abgech Voir le message
    Je vais être brutal et totalement politiquement incorrect : le monde est un peu meilleur aujourd'hui !
    Heureusement qu’il y a encore des gens politiquement incorrects. Bush avait aussi déclaré que « le monde est plus sûr » après avoir renversé Sadam en Irak.



    Pour le VN, on peut encore lire ceci: PHẬT TỬ HỒ TẤN ANH

  7. #6
    Le Việt Nam est fier de toi Avatar de Bao Nhân
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2005
    Localisation
    En seine Saint-Denis
    Messages
    5 370

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Quangourou Voir le message
    elle imposera notamment l'adoption d'un code de la famille faisant des femmes l'égal des hommes, et bannissant la polygamie, la divorce et l'adultère.
    Sur ces points, je suis 100% d'accord avec vous
    Enfin, comme quoi cela montre que vous n'étiez pas aussi négative qu'on a trop souvent tendance à imaginer.
    Dernière modification par NoiVongTayLon ; 28/04/2011 à 07h10. Motif: Demande de BaoNhan...
    Bảo Nhân : fascination, impression and passion

  8. #7
    Repose en paix Avatar de Agemon
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2005
    Localisation
    Médoc
    Messages
    1 982

    Par défaut

    Le passé est le passé.
    Rien ne sortirait de bon en remuant le passé.
    Il faut savoir tourner la page et pardonner.
    Que Dieu recueille l'âme de Mme Nhu.


    Pour le bouddhiste : Le pardon libère celui qui pardonne.
    Dans le bouddhisme, où l’idée d’un Dieu d’amour qui pardonne n’existe pas, ce qui est mis en avant est l’effet que le pardon peut avoir sur celui qui pardonne.Quand un bouddhiste pardonne, c’est lui qui en est le premier bénéficiaire. Le pardon est en effet l’un des visages de la sagesse libératrice que le Bouddha a découvert.

    Islam, Dieu a l’initiative du pardon: «Demandez pardon à votre Seigneur et revenez à Lui en pécheurs repentants» (sourate 113) La Charia ne permet pas le pardon (mon avis).

    Chez les Chrétiens:
    Dieu me pardonne! Et c’est au nom de ce pardon reçu que je suis invité à pardonner : entre Dieu et moi s’inscrit le visage du frère ; et c’est lui qui va vérifier l’authenticité de mon amour pour Dieu !

    Je suis croyant.
    Dernière modification par Agemon ; 27/04/2011 à 23h42. Motif: Color
    [LEFT][COLOR=#c0504d]Et si vous venez faire un tour chez moi ! [/COLOR][/LEFT]
    [COLOR=#c0504d][COLOR=#c0504d][SIZE=3][FONT=Calibri]- [/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR][URL="http://khmercanada.voila.net/Tapa/tapa7.htm"][B]VIÊT NAM MẾN YÊU.[/B][/URL] [/COLOR]

  9. #8
    Le Việt Nam est fier de toi Avatar de Bao Nhân
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2005
    Localisation
    En seine Saint-Denis
    Messages
    5 370

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Agemon Voir le message
    Le passé est le passé.
    Rien ne sortirait de bon en remuant le passé.
    Il faut savoir tourner la page et pardonner.
    Que Dieu recueille l'âme de Mme Nhu.


    Pour le bouddhiste : Le pardon libère celui qui pardonne.
    Dans le bouddhisme, où l’idée d’un Dieu d’amour qui pardonne n’existe pas, ce qui est mis en avant est l’effet que le pardon peut avoir sur celui qui pardonne.Quand un bouddhiste pardonne, c’est lui qui en est le premier bénéficiaire. Le pardon est en effet l’un des visages de la sagesse libératrice que le Bouddha a découvert.

    Islam, Dieu a l’initiative du pardon: «Demandez pardon à votre Seigneur et revenez à Lui en pécheurs repentants» (sourate 113) La Charia ne permet pas le pardon (mon avis).

    Chez les Chrétiens:
    Dieu me pardonne! Et c’est au nom de ce pardon reçu que je suis invité à pardonner : entre Dieu et moi s’inscrit le visage du frère ; et c’est lui qui va vérifier l’authenticité de mon amour pour Dieu !

    Je suis croyant.
    Et puis, il faut aussi se demander si l'on est, moralement parlant, assez bien placé pour pouvoir pardonner à qui que ce soit.
    Bảo Nhân : fascination, impression and passion

  10. #9
    Repose en paix Avatar de Agemon
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2005
    Localisation
    Médoc
    Messages
    1 982

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Bao Nhân Voir le message
    Et puis, il faut aussi se demander si l'on est, moralement parlant, assez bien placé pour pouvoir pardonner à qui que ce soit.
    Il est évident qu'on ne peut se placer à la place des autres pour pardonner mais on peut demander, je ne crois pas qu'une demande soit si déplacée que cela ? Je n'ai fait que demander seulement pour ceux qui peuvent ou qui veulent m'entendre, entendre la sagesse de ne pas remuer le passé. Le reste est facile à comprendre !!!!

    Etant croyant, je sais que la décision de pardonner n'appartient qu'à Dieu ou ................. Bouddha pour les bouddhistes.

    Ce que pensent les autres n'ont peu d’importance pour moi. Personnellement, cela me gêne de parler sur une personne, qu'importe son passé, alors qu'elle vient de d.c.d. - j'ai le respect des morts.

    "Jamais la haine ne cesse par la haine ; c'est la bienveillance qui réconcilie." - Bouddha
    [LEFT][COLOR=#c0504d]Et si vous venez faire un tour chez moi ! [/COLOR][/LEFT]
    [COLOR=#c0504d][COLOR=#c0504d][SIZE=3][FONT=Calibri]- [/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR][URL="http://khmercanada.voila.net/Tapa/tapa7.htm"][B]VIÊT NAM MẾN YÊU.[/B][/URL] [/COLOR]

  11. #10
    Passionné du Việt Nam Avatar de dannyboy
    Date d'inscription
    juillet 2010
    Messages
    1 120

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par Agemon Voir le message
    Le passé est le passé.
    Rien ne sortirait de bon en remuant le passé.
    Il faut savoir tourner la page et pardonner.
    Que Dieu recueille l'âme de Mme Nhu.


    Pour le bouddhiste : Le pardon libère celui qui pardonne.
    Dans le bouddhisme, où l’idée d’un Dieu d’amour qui pardonne n’existe pas, ce qui est mis en avant est l’effet que le pardon peut avoir sur celui qui pardonne.Quand un bouddhiste pardonne, c’est lui qui en est le premier bénéficiaire. Le pardon est en effet l’un des visages de la sagesse libératrice que le Bouddha a découvert.

    Islam, Dieu a l’initiative du pardon: «Demandez pardon à votre Seigneur et revenez à Lui en pécheurs repentants» (sourate 113) La Charia ne permet pas le pardon (mon avis).

    Chez les Chrétiens:
    Dieu me pardonne! Et c’est au nom de ce pardon reçu que je suis invité à pardonner : entre Dieu et moi s’inscrit le visage du frère ; et c’est lui qui va vérifier l’authenticité de mon amour pour Dieu !

    Je suis croyant.
    Je n’ai pas l’impression que Mme Ngô Dinh Nhu avait, jusqu’à la fin de sa vie, ressenti le besoin d’un pardon de qui que ce soit. Je me limiterais donc à une analyse froide de l’histoire.

    Le Président Diêm avait, à l’époque, une petite chance d’éviter une longue guerre civile entre vietnamiens. Il avait essayé de négocier avec les nordistes. Ca n’a pas marché car les américains ne lui ont pas facilité la tâche. Sa belle-sœur, en provoquant inutilement toute la communauté bouddhiste ne lui a pas beaucoup aidé non plus dans sa difficile tâche.

Page 1 sur 3 123 DernièreDernière

Informations de la discussion

Utilisateur(s) sur cette discussion

Il y a actuellement 1 utilisateur(s) naviguant sur cette discussion. (0 utilisateur(s) et 1 invité(s))

Règles de messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de nouvelles discussions
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des réponses
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des pièces jointes
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •  
A Propos

Forumvietnam.fr® - Forum vietnam® est le 1er Forum de discussion de référence sur le Vietnam pour les pays francophones. Nous avons pour objectif de proposer à toutes les personnes s'intéressant au Viêt-Nam, un espace de discussions, d'échanges et d'offrir une bonne source d'informations, d'avis, et d'expériences sur les sujets qui traversent la société vietnamienne.

Si vous souhaitez nous contacter, utilisez notre formulaire de contact


© 2021 - Copyright Forumvietnam.fr® - Tous droits réservés
Nous rejoindre