Page 1 sur 3 123 DernièreDernière
Affichage des résultats 1 à 10 sur 29

Discussion: Corruption au Vietnam

  1. #1
    Jeune Viêt Avatar de wazabi
    Date d'inscription
    février 2008
    Messages
    113

    Par défaut Corruption au Vietnam

    J'aimerais connaitre vos points de vue concernant un sujet délicat, mais important pour le progres du pays.

    Patrick Tan 25 June 2007 “Lying has become an everyday habit” as officials ignore fraud at home.

    Earlier this month, Vietnam’s top anti-corruption agency, the Government Inspectorate, completed its annual investigations in the country’s central, central highlands, western and southern regions, and to no one’s surprise, nobody found dust in his own home, although they found plenty elsewhere.

    “The higher levels only detected corruption in lower levels. Provinces detected corruption in districts, districts did the same with communes. No one said they had found corruption in their own organization,” Bui Ngoc Lam, Deputy Head of the Government Inspectorate, told the press. Apparently in the minds of many state officials, if there are problems, they must exist elsewhere.

    This attitude has become pervasive. Last year, in a similar investigation 28 ministries and sectors as well as 58 provinces and cities submitted their reports to the central government. The result? Only six of the units reported corruption. The rest happily declared, “No corruption here.!”


    At that time, Prof. Nguyen Dinh Cu, the lead author of Vietnam’s first corruption survey, said he was surprised that so many ministries and provinces were “immaculate.”

    “There are only two cases that can explain this: first, there is corruption but it is not detected, or there is no corruption so of course corruption is not reported. I myself believe in the first case: corruption exists but it is not detected.”


    According to international monitors, corruption is rife in Vietnam. In its 2006 Corruption Perceptions Index, the monitoring group Transparency International placed Vietnam 111th of 163 countries. Even the Communist Party’s leaders have warned of the danger posed to its legitimacy by corruption. Corruption “threatens the survival of our regime,” As Party Chief Nong Duc Manh told party members at the National Congress last year.
    “Leading officials must be responsible for the shortcomings, corruption and wastefulness in their branches, localities and units,” Manh told a party plenum in 2004. “Driving back corruption and wastefulness is an important task to consolidate the people’s confidence and promote the strength of the great national unity for the cause of national construction and defense.”
    But despite such fierce rhetoric, party officials seem to be a blissful state of denial. Anti-corruption begins at home, yet many government agencies prefer to point at others and few are willing to clean up their own act.


    Many lawmakers have lamented the lack of will to confront dishonesty in state agencies. Last November, when the National Assembly discussed the implementation of Vietnam’s one-year-old anti-corruption law, just over half of the country’s 64 provinces and cities had worked out an action plan. A National Assembly Deputy commented that some local leaders “plainly pretended there was no corruption at all in their agencies.”


    One man’s corruption….
    But what is corruption in the eyes of state employees? The official salaries of Vietnam’s public officials are notoriously low. In October last year minimum salaries for state employees were raised by nearly 30 percent — but the minimum is still only 28 dollars per month. As a result, many workers on the government payroll resort to getting money any way they can.


    Is another’s livelihood
    We are living in a society where we have to lie to one another. Everyone receives salaries but no one lives on them. Lying has become an everyday habit,” lamented Tran Quoc Thuan,vice chairman of the National Assembly, in an interview with Thanh Nien, an official publication of the Vietnam Youth Association. In this context, Thuan said, it is taken for granted that a state official can take a “commission” for whatever he does in his job.


    “The current state structure and mechanism are creating loopholes for corrupt people to loot the state budget,” the official said. “It would be amazing if a single official is not corrupted.”


    While people at all levels may not like it, when corruption permeates all institutions, they learn to live with it as it gradually transforms itself into a simple fact of life. Vietnam’s first systematic survey of corruption, released in 2005, showed that three quarters of the respondents listed corruption as the country’s most serious problem. However, according to the World Bank’s Vietnam Development Report of 2006, few companies see corruption as an obstacle to their business. Most enterprises appear to have simply adapted to reality.
    That doesn’t mean there isn’t a flurry of activity aimed at combating the problem. Periodic executions take place, such as that of Phung Long That, a former senior customs official who was shot by a firing squad in March 2006 for abetting one of the country’s largest smuggling rings. That, the former head of the anti-smuggling investigations squad, helped to smuggle US$83 million in goods, mostly electronics and cars, into the country. Some 72 other defendants, many of them customs or police officers, were given lengthy jail terms.Since the beginning of 2007, at least 33 others have been sentenced to death, 24 for drug trafficking, according to figures compiled by several news outlets from officials and state media. Four have been executed.
    The government inspectorate established a new anticorruption department in December. According to an upcoming government decree, heads of agencies and units will be held responsible for any corruption cases occurring under their watch. But it will be not surprising if anti-corruption initiatives fail to achieve their objectives. The reality is that the laws in Vietnam look good on paper, but that’s by and large where they remain because of weak enforcement.


    The attitude seems to be that playing the game by the rules never works for ordinary people. The clean-up strategy targets lower governmental levels, while clans with powerful connections are rarely touched.


    Thus while people acknowledge corruption is rampant and that the fight against graft needs strengthening, real change is proving elusive.

    Asia Sentinel - Not in My House: Corruption in Vietnam
    Knowing is not enough, you must apply. Willing is not enough, you must do. By Bruce Lee.

  2. # ADS
    Circuit publicitaire
    Date d'inscription
    Toujours
    Messages
    Plusieurs


     

  3. #2
    Avatar de thuong19
    Date d'inscription
    septembre 2007
    Localisation
    Corrèze
    Messages
    4 720

    Par défaut

    hello Wasabi,
    can you translate please ?

  4. #3
    mer
    mer est déconnecté
    Jeune Viêt Avatar de mer
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2008
    Messages
    108

    Par défaut

    La corruption est pésente partout au Vietnam.

    Tu arrives au Vietnam sans visa,si tu donnes le bon billet vert on te fera un visa sur place.Ailleurs centre de rétention.

    Tu te fais arreter en 2 roues sans permis,100 000 et tu repars.
    Avec une grosse cylindrée 1 500 000 et tu repars.
    En voiture pas de permis traduit,500 000 et c'est bon.


    Dans n'importe quel administration,besoin d'un document?Besoin que ça aille un peu plus vite ton dossier?Pépetes et pépetes.


    ETC...ETC.


    En meme temps pourquoi pas,on perd moins de temps,ils se vendent et tu
    les achètes...
    toutouyoutou,toutouyoutou...Toutou toutou toutou toutou toutoutouyoutou.J'adore l'aérobic et le rouge.

  5. #4
    Habitué du Việt Nam Avatar de PatC
    Date d'inscription
    août 2007
    Localisation
    HUE au 02/02/08
    Messages
    364

    Par défaut

    Perso, ca me fait ch... !!!
    Je fais mon maximum pour etre en regle, ca prend du temps, certes, mais ca evite de devoir raquer a chaque fois quand on n'a pas de sous en trop.

  6. #5
    Le Việt Nam est fier de toi Avatar de HUYARD Pierre
    Date d'inscription
    novembre 2006
    Localisation
    Ho Chi Minh City
    Messages
    3 200

    Par défaut partage

    Citation Envoyé par wazabi Voir le message
    However, according to the World Bank’s Vietnam Development Report of 2006, few companies see corruption as an obstacle to their business. Most enterprises appear to have simply adapted to reality.

    Cependant, d'après le rapport 2006 de la banque mondiale sur le Développement du Vietnam, peu de sociétés voient dans la corruption un obstacle dans les affaires. Il s'avère que la plupart des Entreprises se sont simplement adaptées à la réalité locale.

    Vous abordez la un sujet delicat, et eminement casse-gueule.
    En fait, la corruption, c'est quand on ne partage pas les enveloppes.
    Cette definition reduit beaucoup la dimension et la portee du probleme.
    Mais est-ce un probleme ? Et pour qui?

  7. #6
    Le Việt Nam est fier de toi Avatar de robin des bois
    Date d'inscription
    décembre 2005
    Messages
    6 259

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par wazabi Voir le message
    J'aimerais connaitre vos points de vue concernant un sujet délicat, mais important pour le progres du pays.

    Patrick Tan 25 June 2007 “Lying has become an everyday habit” as officials ignore fraud at home.


    - La première des choses est de savoir qu'il n'y a pas que le Vietnam et les pays asiatiques à souffrir de la corruption.

    Donc çà n'est pas que "chez les autres".

    -Secundo , il y a "corruption et corruption"..

    * Celle qui consiste, dans les pays où le niveau de salaire est inférieur au minimum vital, à arrondir ses fins de mois pour -non pas pour s'enrichir- mais pour amener du riz dns la gamelle, peut s'appeler soit "2ème emploi" , "revenu complémentaire" et mieux encore pour faire plaisir à notre Président:
    "Travailler plus pour gagner plus"

    Moi çà ne me choque pas fondamentalement

    * La corruption qui s'appuie étroitement sur le Pouvoir( y compris étatique) et le détournement d'argent public: çà c'est de la vraie corruption.
    Et celle-là est redoutable, car elle nuit directement aux plus pauvres pour enrichir une minorité et elle est franchement immorale celle-là.(par ex quand on détourne des budgets Santé ou Education de certains pays donateurs au détriment des populations les plus pauvres, je considère que çà devient un crime.)

    Il est exact qu'elle est très présente dans certains pays à parti unique.. mais on la trouve ailleurs aussi.. Y a même un classement international pour s'y retrouver dans cette "drôle d'échelle des valeurs" !!!

    (ps: sujet déjà traité à de nombreuses reprises sur F-V)

  8. #7
    Avatar de NoiVongTayLon
    Date d'inscription
    mai 2007
    Localisation
    France/Paris
    Messages
    4 414

    Par défaut

    Bonjour à tous

    A propos de la corruption, je vous invite à lire le rapport mondial sur la corruption 2007 de Transparency International (TI) :

    Global corruption report

    Bonne lecture
    NVTL
    Một cây làm chẳng nên non, ba cây chụm lại nên hòn núi cao : Nối Vòng Tay Lớn



  9. #8
    Ne mérite pas notre confiance Avatar de frère Singe
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2006
    Localisation
    Paris (plus qu'un an à tirer!)
    Messages
    1 804

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par robin des bois Voir le message
    (...)

    -Secundo , il y a "corruption et corruption"..

    * Celle qui consiste, dans les pays où le niveau de salaire est inférieur au minimum vital, à arrondir ses fins de mois pour -non pas pour s'enrichir- mais pour amener du riz dns la gamelle, peut s'appeler soit "2ème emploi" , "revenu complémentaire" et mieux encore pour faire plaisir à notre Président:
    "Travailler plus pour gagner plus"

    Moi çà ne me choque pas fondamentalement
    (...)
    Sauf qu'il faut voir au dépend de qui se fait cette "gentille" corruption. Quand c'est un flic qui racket 50.000d un paysan qui ne savait pas lire le paneau de sens interdit, ben ça lui fait un petit complément de salaire, et au paysan une économie de 350.000d, tout le monde est content.
    Mais quand c'est un chirurgien qui n'accepte de faire du zèle que lorsque la famille d'un patient lui verse un complément de salaire, on arrive à une situation où les plus démunis n'ont pas accès aux soins et, d'une manière générale, ne sont pas considérés puisqu'ils ne rapportent rien. Niveau éthique, on repassera.

  10. #9
    Le Việt Nam est fier de toi Avatar de robin des bois
    Date d'inscription
    décembre 2005
    Messages
    6 259

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par frère Singe Voir le message
    - Sauf qu'il faut voir au dépend de qui se fait cette "gentille" corruption. Quand c'est un flic qui racket 50.000d un paysan qui ne savait pas lire le paneau de sens interdit, ben ça lui fait un petit complément de salaire, et au paysan une économie de 350.000d, tout le monde est content.
    - Mais quand c'est un chirurgien qui n'accepte de faire du zèle que lorsque la famille d'un patient lui verse un complément de salaire, on arrive à une situation où les plus démunis n'ont pas accès aux soins et, d'une manière générale, ne sont pas considérés puisqu'ils ne rapportent rien. Niveau éthique, on repassera.
    Je reconnais que mon " pdv ne représente que moi ": personne n'est obligé de le partager..
    Ceci étant dit, dans les 2 exemples que vous citez:

    - le " gentil Flic" que vous décrivez fait partie du système de gouvernement puisqu'il exerce une "fonction régalienne.." Donc nous sommes bien dans lae domaine de la Corruption(mélange de pouvoir, autorité et argent)

    - le Chirurgien ne fait pas partie des Rmistes, que je sache..
    Je dirais qu'il vire dans le " racket"..
    En France, çà existe aussi dans le milieu médical; certains se font d'ailleurs attaquer en Justice..
    Quant à la déontologie de l'Ordre des Médecins, créé sous Vichy: c'est pas forcément le top malgré le "Serment d'Hypocrate" !!!

  11. #10
    Ne mérite pas notre confiance Avatar de frère Singe
    Date d'inscription
    avril 2006
    Localisation
    Paris (plus qu'un an à tirer!)
    Messages
    1 804

    Par défaut

    Citation Envoyé par robin des bois Voir le message
    (...)

    - le Chirurgien ne fait pas partie des Rmistes, que je sache..
    Je dirais qu'il vire dans le " racket"..
    En France, çà existe aussi dans le milieu médical; certains se font d'ailleurs attaquer en Justice..
    Quant à la déontologie de l'Ordre des Médecins, créé sous Vichy: c'est pas forcément le top malgré le "Serment d'Hypocrate" !!!
    Alors là, je veux bien vérifier, mais j'ai cru comprendre que les médecins au Vietnam étaient payés ridiculement peu, encore pire que les enseignants, au regard du niveau de formation. J'ai des amis médecins, je leur poserai simplement la question. A suivre, donc.
    Par ailleurs, la corruption dans le milieu médical français, c'est suffisamment rare pour que ça puisse encore faire scandale. Au Vietnam, ça ne choque plus personne depuis des lustres...

Page 1 sur 3 123 DernièreDernière

Informations de la discussion

Utilisateur(s) sur cette discussion

Il y a actuellement 1 utilisateur(s) naviguant sur cette discussion. (0 utilisateur(s) et 1 invité(s))

Liens sociaux

Règles de messages

  • Vous ne pouvez pas créer de nouvelles discussions
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des réponses
  • Vous ne pouvez pas envoyer des pièces jointes
  • Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
  •  
A Propos

Forumvietnam.fr® - Forum vietnam® est le 1er Forum de discussion de référence sur le Vietnam pour les pays francophones. Le site Forumvietnam.fr® - Forum vietnam® a pour objectif de proposer à toutes les personnes s'intéressant au Viêt-Nam, un espace de discussions, d'échanges et d'offrir une bonne source d'informations, d'avis, et d'expériences sur les sujets qui traversent la société vietnamienne.

Si vous souhaitez nous contacter, utilisez notre formulaire de contact


© 2013 E-metis Network | Site by E-metis Webdesign
Nous rejoindre
Forumvietnam.fr est propulsé par le moteur vBulletin®.
Copyright © 2013 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1